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Posts Tagged ‘YA’

In early April 2013, I became an full-time literary agent at JABberwocky Literary Agency. In late April 2013, I received a query from an author seeking representation for his YA dystopian manuscript. According to Everyone™, dystopians were extremely hard to sell, a feeling that hasn’t changed much in the intervening three years. But the concept was fresh and unique: in a world where words and gestures have all been copyrighted and you have to pay for the privilege of speaking. After working on some revisions with the author, I was honored to sign him and his amazing manuscript.

Which brings us to now:

Sale announcement for All Rights Reserved by  Gregory Scott Katsoulis

I’m so, so excited to have found a home for both Greg and All Rights Reserved. He was one of my very first clients, All Rights Reserved is one of those stories that sticks with you long after you’ve finished, and I look forward to working with Greg on many more thought-provoking novels!

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About a month ago, I was catching up with a friend, chatting about books (as you do). I mentioned that I’ve been rather disappointed with the young adult novels I’ve read, at which point she whipped out her phone, pulled up the photo of the blurb of Hex Hall, and told me we couldn’t be friends anymore if I didn’t like it.

I’m happy to report that she and I are still friends. Hex Hall is a quick, fun read that has understandable amounts teenage angst. The relationship-angst doesn’t take over the rest of the plot, either. It’s a nice compliment to the story.

I loved that the author included references to literary classics like Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence, Edgar Allen Poe’s “Cask of Amontillado,” as well as poking fun at the current pop culture vampire/werewolf fascination. Neither the werewolves or vampire(s) in Hex Hall are evil — they’re just people, some of whom may have made bad decisions in their lives. Hawkins also brings into focus the horrors of high school cliques and hierarchies, and how being popular or pretty doesn’t necessarily mean you’re a good person.

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